windows-sys

Rust for Windows

Latest version: 0.48.0 registry icon
Maintenance score
100
Safety score
100
Popularity score
100
Check your open source dependency risks. Get immediate insight about security, stability and licensing risks.
Security
  Vulnerabilities
Version Suggest Low Medium High Critical
0.48.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.45.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.42.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.36.1 0 0 0 0 0
0.36.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.35.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.34.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.33.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.32.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.31.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.30.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.29.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.28.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.27.0 0 0 0 0 0
0.0.0 0 0 0 0 0

Stability
Latest release:

0.48.0 - This version is safe to use because it has no known security vulnerabilities at this time. Find out if your coding project uses this component and get notified of any reported security vulnerabilities with Meterian-X Open Source Security Platform

Licensing

Maintain your licence declarations and avoid unwanted licences to protect your IP the way you intended.

Apache-2.0   -   Apache License 2.0

Not a wildcard

Not proprietary

OSI Compliant


MIT   -   MIT License

Not a wildcard

Not proprietary

OSI Compliant



Rust for Windows

The windows and windows-sys crates let you call any Windows API past, present, and future using code generated on the fly directly from the metadata describing the API and right into your Rust package where you can call them as if they were just another Rust module. The Rust language projection follows in the tradition established by C++/WinRT of building language projections for Windows using standard languages and compilers, providing a natural and idiomatic way for Rust developers to call Windows APIs.

Start by adding the following to your Cargo.toml file:

[dependencies.windows]
version = "0.51"
features = [
    "Data_Xml_Dom",
    "Win32_Foundation",
    "Win32_Security",
    "Win32_System_Threading",
    "Win32_UI_WindowsAndMessaging",
]

Make use of any Windows APIs as needed:

use windows::{
    core::*, Data::Xml::Dom::*, Win32::Foundation::*, Win32::System::Threading::*,
    Win32::UI::WindowsAndMessaging::*,
};

fn main() -> Result<()> {
    let doc = XmlDocument::new()?;
    doc.LoadXml(h!("<html>hello world</html>"))?;

    let root = doc.DocumentElement()?;
    assert!(root.NodeName()? == "html");
    assert!(root.InnerText()? == "hello world");

    unsafe {
        let event = CreateEventW(None, true, false, None)?;
        SetEvent(event)?;
        WaitForSingleObject(event, 0);
        CloseHandle(event)?;

        MessageBoxA(None, s!("Ansi"), s!("Caption"), MB_OK);
        MessageBoxW(None, w!("Wide"), w!("Caption"), MB_OK);
    }

    Ok(())
}

windows-sys

The windows-sys crate is a zero-overhead fallback for the most demanding situations and primarily where the absolute best compile time is essential. It only includes function declarations (externs), structs, and constants. No convenience helpers, traits, or wrappers are provided.

Start by adding the following to your Cargo.toml file:

[dependencies.windows-sys]
version = "0.48"
features = [
    "Win32_Foundation",
    "Win32_Security",
    "Win32_System_Threading",
    "Win32_UI_WindowsAndMessaging",
]

Make use of any Windows APIs as needed:

use windows_sys::{
    core::*, Win32::Foundation::*, Win32::System::Threading::*, Win32::UI::WindowsAndMessaging::*,
};

fn main() {
    unsafe {
        let event = CreateEventW(std::ptr::null(), 1, 0, std::ptr::null());
        SetEvent(event);
        WaitForSingleObject(event, 0);
        CloseHandle(event);

        MessageBoxA(0, s!("Ansi"), s!("Caption"), MB_OK);
        MessageBoxW(0, w!("Wide"), w!("Caption"), MB_OK);
    }
}